FIRST AIRED: April 7, 2017

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00:00:01
>> A spike for oil, a wavering dollar, and markets opening low. New of the US launching cruise missiles against Syria's military prompting a bump in demand for safe investments across global markets on Friday. Reuters breaking views columnist Pete Sweeney has been watching the movements from Hong Kong.>> There's been a market reaction.
00:00:20
We see gold up, we see oil futures up. We see the volatility index futures, by which investors hedge against future risk, is up. If you don't like volatility, if you don't like excitement, if you don't like the uncertainty of Trump, who is a wildcard, you know, what he might do there, and how that might change the dynamics, certainly you wanna hedge.
00:00:39
>> So far, the biggest jumps in worth have been in gold and the Japanese yen, where investors like to park their cash in on certain times. Another is German government bonds, seen as one of the safest assets in the world, also seeing a boost with similar gains across Europe.
00:00:56
Oil price is also bouncing sharply higher after knee-jerk concerns over supply if tensions in the Middle East escalate, a high for the month. But in the grand scheme of things, Thursday's missile strike might not stir up a lot of volatility.>> This is a market that's used to American fire power being deployed by remote control in the Middle East.
00:01:16
The situation in Syria has been going on for years now, it has not stopped. The S&P 500 from hitting record highs, so I mean, it's gonna take a little bit more then an airstrike to really get people that excited. That said, going forward if this is a signal of more intense engagement to come, who knows what could happen.
00:01:39
>> The dollars worth did dip when news of the strikes broke, but regained the loss with little change after a US official played down the risk of wider escalation. Focus now shifting to American unemployment figures, expected to be released later on Friday.