FIRST AIRED: April 19, 2017

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>> It's gonna be an incredible pipeline.>> President Donald Trump last month, breathing new life into the long delayed Keystone XL Pipeline. But a group of Nebraska farmers and ranchers are still trying to stop it. Energy Reporter, Valerie Volcovici, traveled to the state for a closer look.>> There are almost 90 landowners that live along the proposed path of the key stone are very adamant that the pipeline should not be built.
And they vow to fight this process to the end.>> But while others play up the environmental risks, the farmers are pushing a different argument saying they would wrongly permit a foreign company, TransCanada, to seize private US land to carry the oil from Canada to US Gulf coast, interfering, they say with the grazing and farming at the heart of Nebraska's economy.
Art says Keystone would cut through his 160 acre farm.>> Yeah. It's depressing but we can't sit by and do nothing. We have to be energized.>> The tender of family, will be planting corn along the path with the pipeline. And they will just use all the measures they can.
>> Farmers targeting the Nebraska Public Service Commission. An obscure five member body empowered to approve or reject their proposed route. They'll press their case before the commission had hearings this summer. But even if the commission approves it, lawyers for Tenderup and the others believe challenging the land seizures in court could delay Keystone for years.
TransCanada has one approval in every other state the pipe would run through except Nebraska.>> A new era of American energy policy.>> Trump has made Keystone, which former President Obama rejected, a major plank in his plan to boost US energy and create jobs. Last month, Trump warned he would, quote, call Nebraska if the state got in the way.
But the White House, in the end, has no power to order the pipeline's construction if the state rejects it. An outcome farmers like the Tenderups are counting on.