FIRST AIRED: May 19, 2017

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00:00:00
>> Rippling abs and roaring surf, the film remake of Baywatch dripping in pure LA gold.>> Welcome to Baywatch.>> Except that it was filmed on a tiny island off the coast of Georgia. That's what happens when you don't get a break. A hefty tax break, that is, from the film capital of the world, as Reuters entertainment correspondent Lisa Richwhine explains.
00:00:22
>> Many other states offer generous tax breaks that you can't get in Hollywood. And when you're making a big-budget movie, you need to save every dollar you can.>> More foreign countries luring filmmakers, too. Warner Bros., shot big-budget films Wonder Woman and King Arthur in Britain, Fox chose Australia for Alien Covenant.
00:00:40
California's 20% rebate looking pale compared to a host of locations that offer up to double that, including tax breaks against the salaries of the actors and directors, often among the most expensive costs.>> They figure they've got a lot of advantages here, they have crews here, they have sound stages, and that they don't need to go that far.
00:01:02
But what they're seeing is that the big-budget movies are going elsewhere>> Even tiny Georgia, this time not the state but the former Soviet country, is marketing itself as a place to easily blow up old, crumbling, state-owned buildings, in order to draw the action film crowd. Baywatch star Dwayne Johnson, aka The Rock, pushing for California to bring its business back home.
00:01:24
>> It's great for the crew, they could sleep in their own bed, they're not leaving their families.>> But adding that state lawmakers still have a long way to go.