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>> As th US and Turkish presidents meet in Washington, the reality of a complicated relationship is playing out across the Syria, Turkey border. Turkey, busy fighting the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, which it views as terrorists. And it's furious with Washington over its decision to arm the Kurdish Militia in Syria, the YPG.
Ankara says you cannot distinguish between the two groups. The Turkish military periodically hits the Syrian Kurdish forces with air and artillery strikes. Now Reuter's correspondent, Humayra Pamec, is back from one town on the front line. Sermec left battered by fighting last year between Turkish units and the PKK.
>> Basically, what's been happening in Syria has massively complicated Turkey's relations with its own Kurdish minority and last week's decision by Trump to directly arm the YPG obviously frustrated Ankara to a great extent. It also resonates a lot in Turkey's southeast because the Kurds there see Syrian Kurds as their next of kin.
So, the government policy towards YPG, towards Syrian Kurds, it's actually an element that is upsetting them to a great deal. So, unless there is a, sort of, more sympathetic approach that is encompassing all the Kurds in the region, they feel that they're not going to be in a position to actually make peace with Ankara.
Turkey fears the creation of an independent Kurdish state in Turkey, Syria, and perhaps Iraq. The United States and EU support its view of the PKK as a terrorist organization. But the Syrian Kurds have emerged as Washington's chief ally in defeating Islamic State. Now Turkey and the US will have to find a way to square the circle.
if they can't, the people of Surmac fear they will end up stuck between two wars.