FIRST AIRED: April 4, 2017

Nice work! Enjoy the show!

×

You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!

×

Transcript

00:00:00
>> The St. Petersburg metro explosion was carried out by this man, according to investigators. Akbardzhon Dzhalilov, believed to be a Russian citizen, born in the city of Osh, Kyrgyzstan in 1995. The attacker, named by Russia's state investigative committee, on Tuesday. Authorities said fragments of the suspects body were found amongst the dead, indicating that he was a suicide bomber.
00:00:25
And genetic traces of Dzhalilov were found on a bag containing an explosive device. Monday's blast has killed 14 people so far and injured almost 50. There has been no official claim of responsibility, but Russian media quoted law enforcement officials, saying the perpetrator had radical Islamic links. This raises the possibility that the attack could have been inspired by Islamic State, which has not struck a major city in Russia before.
00:00:51
If confirmed, Moscow's role in Syria's war will come under the spotlight, says Reuters Russia Bureau Chief Christen Lowe.>> Since Russia started using its aircraft to bomb targets in Syria and support Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, Islamic State has repeatedly, through its propoganda arms and its own websites, issued threats to Russia, and said that Russia will be made to pay for those actions.
00:01:18
We can anticipate that the Kremlin would say this kind of attack, if it does turn out that Islamists were behind it, that this justifies what Russia is doing in Syria, where Russia said it is combating terrorism. And they would say it justifies the crackdowns that Russia is conducting on Islamist rebellions.
00:01:35
>> But some Russians may feel that joining forces with the Syrian army has made them more of a target. Moscow has declared three days of mourning following the attack.