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00:00:00
>> Once celebrations fade after the Kurdish referendum in Iraq, the big question is, can there be stability given all the tensions around the votes? I'm Michael Georgy, special Middle East correspondent for Reuters. I'm standing in Erbil, the seat of government for the Kurdish day on regional government one day after the Kurds held a referendum on independence.
00:00:21
Under ideal conditions it will lead to an independent state. But that will take probably years even if there's no opposition from neighboring countries like Turkey and Iran, and Western opposition. There are many questions need to be answered. Can Kurdish leaders produce a viable economy? Can Kurds close their ranks and actually work towards a state?
00:00:40
Not all Kurdish leaders are supporting the idea of independent states. The Kurds have oil which has been a source of friction with Baghdad. They have been selling their oil independently, but that probably won't be enough to set up a state, pay government salaries, create a viable economy, lure investment.
00:00:59
All these things must happen before any state is established. What happens next is the Kurds will have to start working amongst themselves to try to set up a state. But, again, that will take time, I think they'll have to reassure Kurds that they can create this state. But the bigger question is, how are they gonna manage the hostilities?
00:01:18
Turkey and Iran are completely opposed to this vote and to an independent state because they have their own Restive Kurdish population which they don't want this to spread to their land. Also Baghdad is opposed to it. You have tensions between Iranian-backed Shiite militias and Kurdish fighters. So all these questions are very tough, all very hard to manage.
00:01:41
So I think no one should really jump to any conclusions that this can happen any time soon.