FIRST AIRED: September 22, 2017

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> And it is unacceptable that others financially support this criminal, rogue regime.>> President Trump on Thursday turning the screws a little tighter on North Korea. Blacklisting those who do business with Pyongyang. As it defies the world with provocative nuclear tests and missile launches.>> Today, I'm announcing a new executive order to target individuals, companies, financial institutions that finance and facilitate trade with North Korea.
00:00:32
>> Reporter Matt Spitalnick is on the story.>> The new sanctions enable the United States to target a range of North Korean industries, including mining, manufacturing. It will go after financial entities outside North Korea that facilitate its missile and nuclear programs. The intent is to move a bit closer to Iran style sanctions regime that was posed on Tehran years back and ultimately brought it to the negotiating table to work out a nuclear deal.
00:01:06
>> Trump stopping short of going after North Korea's biggest trading partner, China, but saying China had ordered its banks to cut ties with the regime.>> China may be close to being at the end of its rope with North Korea. The continuing missile tests have been a thumb in the eye to Beijing, and this is actually showing a willingness to take concrete steps.
00:01:28
>> The sanctions announced at a meeting with the leaders of South Korea and Japan, coming in the wake of Trump's incendiary speech to the UN General Assembly this week, threatening to destroy North Korea. That some said cut off chances for a diplomatic solution to the crisis. Trump Thursday insisting that path is not closed.
00:01:46
>> This is a complete denuclearization of North Korea that we seek.>> Thursday's move seen as a sign Trump is getting more time for economic pressures to work, despite US threats of military action.