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00:00:00
>> Raqqa's deserted old city. The ancient mud brick walls encircling the Syrian city are almost the only structures still intact. Fighting between US-backed militias and Islamic State have left no building untouched. Some here say the city was sacrificed, for the sake of defeating terrorism. As reconstruction slowly begins, Reuters correspondent John Davison says it will be no easy task.
00:00:25
>> We're right inside the old city of Raqqa now, which was Islamic State's de facto Syrian capital for three years. As you can see, there's a lot of destruction. Many buildings look like the one behind me, have been completely flattened. Further inside the old city here, entire streets have buildings pouring rubble out onto the road.
00:00:42
There are no signs of human life here, apart from the Syrian Democratic forces, who set up bases in abandoned houses. Officials in the Raqqa Civil Council, which has been set up to rebuild and eventually govern Raqqa, say that it will cost millions and millions of dollars to repair damaged parts of the city.
00:00:59
Water towers have been destroyed, electricity networks are completely down. There is a big bridge that leads into Iraq on the east side which has been smashed as well, by an air strike. You drive through part of the ancient city walls, that have been breached by the Syrian Democratic Forces as they fought their way in.
00:01:16
And there are cars outside that have been upturned and burned out, there's dust and rubble everywhere. Raqqa Civil Council officials also complain that there has been foreign aid that has been insufficient, or too slow to come in, meaning that they've barely started reconstruction work yet. And Western diplomats are worried that if reconstruction of Raqqa takes too long, or if the services that are provided are insufficient for people to return, then there will be further unrest and further violence.