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00:00:01
>> The number of US visas issued to six Muslim countries dropped after a June Supreme Court ruling allowed partial implementation of President Donald Trumps' travel ban. A Reuters analysis of government data shows visas issued each month to citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen dropped by 18% compared to the month before the Supreme Court ruling.
00:00:28
Reuters correspondent, Yeganeh Torbati.>> We don't know whether this is because fewer are applying for visas in the first place, or whether consular officers are being much more strict when they asses people from these six countries. That's something that the data doesn't show up, all we know is final visa issuances.
00:00:47
But we can sort of make some informed speculation that when there are all these headlines about the travel ban being back in place. And this ban affecting lots of different people, that people from those six countries might be less likely to apply for visas because it's a very costly process.
00:01:05
>> That original January travel ban and a more limited form of the executive order issued in March, were hamstrung by months of legal challenges. Until the Supreme Court approved a restricted version in June.>> The significance is that even though Trump has said that the courts' limits on his travel ban are really about political correctness.
00:01:26
And that he wishes the travel ban were broader and affected more people, it has had a huge impact. I've heard anecdotally from a lot of different lawyers and their clients that people who use to be able to get tourist visas pretty quickly. For example, grandparents, older Iranians who were coming here to the United States to visit their children.
00:01:45
Are now being thrown into what's called administrative processing or just, sort of, a bureaucratic word for security checks. Much more often and those checks they say are taking far longer, where they used to take two to three months, now they're taking six, seven, eight, even nine months or longer.
00:02:02
>> On Sunday, Trump issued a third version of the ban which indefinitely restricts travelers from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad, and North Korea. Some government officials from Venezuela will also be barred.