FIRST AIRED: December 9, 2016

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00:00:00
>> Tradition, family, an Austria for Austrians alone. The Freedom Party's far right message strikes a chord in the eastern state or Burgenland. Candidate and local boy, Norbert Hofer, lost Sunday's presidential poll. But here, 60% voted for him. I'm Reuters reporter, Lucy Fieldren in Eisenstadt. A heartland of support for the Freedom Party.
00:00:21
There's no sense of defeat here. Instead, they've got their eye on the next election.>> Hofer's populous party has governed Burgenland in coalition for a year and a half. At its State Parliamentary Club, they're working on the next general election, planned for 2018. It'll be by proportional representation, and Austria's most popular party has about a third of the vote.
00:00:43
>> These are the areas where->> That sea of blue shows rural support for its anti-immigration stance, boosted by the migrant crisis.>> We don't want this politic, that says, okay, we just help other people from other countries. From Syria or where they come from and not help our own people.
00:01:02
>> The party's local secretary believes the deeply unpopular government could fall apart soon.>>
FOREIGN]
> This entrepreneur and party volunteers says there are many like her who are supporters but don't want to be identify to such.>> A lot of people that I work with in business. A lot people in my circle of friends who were all very well educated, do support the Freedom Party.
00:01:20
It is time for a new direction for Austria.>>
00:01:42
It's a misconception that the majority of people voting for supporting the Freedom Party are less educated, are not open-minded.>> Austrians may have halted the populist wave in Europe, but it's likely just a pause. The far-right's eye is on a bigger prize, the next government.