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Transcript

00:00:01
>> For US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, it was like a trip around the world without ever leaving Washington. Pompeo, Wednesday, headed up to Capitol Hill, answering questions on Syria, Iran, Russia, China, and of course North Korea. Senators on both sides of the aisle pressing for clarity on what really was agreed to in that historic summit.
00:00:24
>> The North Koreans understand the scope of the requests that we're making with respect to denuclearization, and the elements that would be required to their fissile material on hand, their capacity to continue to develop that material. Weaponization efforts, engineering, physics efforts as well as the weapons and missiles that would deliver them, so we've been pretty unambiguous in our conversations about what we mean when we say complete denuclearization.
00:00:51
>> Not far from that discussion about North Korea and nukes was China. Pompeo told lawmakers that China is slipping when it comes to keeping up pressure on Pyongyang with economic sanctions. But an even bigger topic than China, Russia and the plans for a Putin-Trump summit.>> Well, Russian election interference in the United States and in a way that has harmed, our key NATO allies be a focus of this summit with President Putin.
00:01:19
>> Russia's trying to, Take advantage of a vacuum that's been created.>> Are we willing to allow Russia to rejoin the G7?>> The President deeply believes, that having Russia be part of these important geostrategic conversations is inevitable. The President is looking forward to an opportunity to find those handful of places where we can have productive conversations that lead to improvements for each of our two countries.
00:01:45
>> But that doesn't mean going soft on Russia, Pompeo telling lawmakers, Russian sanctions should stay in place, even as both sides agree to an official sit down.