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00:00:00
>> The US Supreme Court on Friday put broad new limits on the ability of police to use cell phone location data to track criminal suspects. In a five four decision, the court said police generally need to get a warrant to track someone's movements based on cell data, a victory for digital privacy advocates.
00:00:19
Until now, police have routinely obtained such data from wireless carriers without a warrant. But the court ruled that amounts to an unreasonable search and seizure under the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. The ruling stems from a case involving a man who was convicted in several armed robberies with the help of cell phone location data that linked him to the crime scenes.
00:00:40
Correspondent Lawrence Hurley is following developments.>> This is a significant ruling because it's the latest in a long line of cases now in which the Supreme Court has curbed the ability of police to access certain information as technology changes, in an era where now everyone has a cell phone.
00:00:58
The Court ruling is somewhat limited though because the Court said this just about historic cell phone location information. It doesn't even affect real-time cell phone location information, which could come up to the Court in a different case.>> Chief Justice John Roberts, who wrote the decision, said it has no bearing on traditional surveillance techniques, such as security cameras or on data collection for national security.
00:01:21
It also allows police to obtain cell data without a warrant in emergency situations.