FIRST AIRED: January 12, 2018

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00:00:01
>> Sidi Bouzid in Tunisia, the cradle of the revolution that sparked the Arab Spring. It was in this impoverished town that mass protests broke out in 2011. They engulfed the rest of the North African country, bringing down autocrat Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. People here hoped for a new beginning.
00:00:18
But now they've joined another wave of rage that has spread to 20 towns and cities, this time against austerity.>> People started here the revolutions which brought down the regime of Ben Ali. And since then, people have become very angry because all their expectations haven't gone through. Many have gone to Libya, either to join the Islamic State or to find jobs.
00:00:43
People are in a state of desperation. And it will be interesting to see whether these protests, which started in Tunis, the capital, and other cities, if they're going to grow. I mean, the government is under pressure.>> More unrest in the capital Tunis on Wednesday. Tunisia was the democratic success story of the Arab Spring.
00:01:01
But it has reaped few economic benefits. Militant attacks have scared off foreign tourists and investment. Most people are worse off than before, with youth unemployment at 30%.>>
FOREIGN]
> That sparked the latest protests, though they're far from the scale of 2011.
00:01:28
Citizens who won't survive end up being destroyed by the tough living conditions.>>
00:01:50
>> They can't find jobs. Now they are supposed to pay higher taxes, pay more for petrol, or even for mobile phone calls. They say they can't handle anymore.>> In Sidi Bouzid, they say the government promised to hire some 60 graduates to the country's bloated public services. It was one more broken promise that fed their fury.