FIRST AIRED: July 18, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:00
>>
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00:00:15
Modern jets are essentially flying computers, but what if those computers could be hacked while the plane was in flight? It's the stuff of nightmares for air travelers. At this weeks Farm air show big airlines were taking the threat seriously.>> Yes we do and we have systems in the airline to mitigate against such hackings.
00:00:41
Nobody today, in this modern world of Internet can be 100% insured against hedge.>> The threat arises because air travel has joined the connected revolution.>> Modern aircraft are never truly cut off from the world, even when they're miles up in the air. Take the engines, for example, they're constantly sending data back to the manufactuerers, alerting them to possible technical faults.
00:01:04
>> The worry is that anything connected it potentially hackable. Though right now, it wouldn't be a job for amateurs. So when an aircraft is in flight, the threat actor has to be very advanced. And I would say if there was going to be an attack from a cyber perspective on an in-flight aircraft, it would likely have to come from a nation state.
00:01:30
>> That's David Wajsgras of US defense giant, Raytheon. His company just did a deal with Jordan to protect the King's aircraft. But Raytheon says for now the real hacking threat to planes comes when they're on the ground.>> There's a lot more access points, because you're talking about maintenance, you're talking about a number of people that are involved in that particular activity.
00:01:53
>> For airlines, that puts the emphasis on finding insiders with ill intentions. Find them and your plane is probably safe. Whether that will reassure nervous fliers is another question.