FIRST AIRED: April 4, 2018

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00:00:00
>> Two years ago, Turkey's relations with Russia were crisis after Turkish forces shot down a Russian jet in Northern Syria. Now in 2018, Moscow and Ankara are working together with Tehran to try and reduce the violence in Syria. Leaders of the three countries will meet in Turkey on Wednesday to try to map a way forward.
00:00:22
I'm Dominic Evans, Reuters bureau chief in Turkey. President Putin arrived in Turkey a day before the summit to attend a formal inauguration for the start of work upon Turkey's first nuclear power plant. This has been delayed for several years partly by diplomatic problems between the two countries. But at the ceremony in Ankara, President Putin and President Erdogan formally started construction work of the plant.
00:00:47
They've been working for several months to try to reduce the violence in Syria and try to ease some of the humanitarian problems across the country. However, they do remain very divided, they support different sides. Russia and Iran have been two of the strongest supporters of President Assad through out the conflict.
00:01:10
Turkey on the other hand, has been supporting rebels and insurgents fighting to overthrow him. So we've seen in different parts of the country, those three power very much with different priorities. It may be that Iran, Russian, and Turkey between them hold the key to some reduction in violence given that they are such major players on both sides of the Syrian civil war.
00:01:35
However, the differences between them, the fact that they are essentially on absolutely opposing sides in the conflict means that it looks very hard for them to overcome those almost insurmountable difference in a day of talks in Turkey.