FIRST AIRED: June 8, 2017

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Transcript

00:00:01
>> Cuba's first true luxury hotel opening its doors in the heart of Havana. But as the guests began to arrive, concerns are mounting that US President Donald Trump might reverse a detente that has fueled a tourist boom with US-operated cruises and scheduled flights relaunching last year after a half century hiatus.
00:00:23
Reuters correspondent Mark Frank is in Havana.>> It's common knowledge, if you're walk around in the streets, it's almost impossible to find anybody who doesn't support improved relations with the United States for lots of reasons. For lots of reasons, for economic reasons, because they have family in the United States, because they think there's many good things about the United States.
00:00:45
>> But now Trump is considering tightening trade and travel relations when he announces his Cuba policy as soon as this month, citing human rights abuses by the socialist Castro government to justify a more hardline policy. And Cubans are not happy. Tourism is the one bright spot in the country's flailing economy which is struggling with falling exports and upheaval in major trade partner, Venezuela.
00:01:10
>> The importance of tourism in Cuba is really as a job generator, both in the state run industry and in the private sector and it's very important right now for the Cuban economy. It's emerging as it was before as the most important part of the economy, and Cuba has many hotels but they tend to be four and five star.
00:01:33
They've also been allowing, for the first time, Cubans themselves, to rent to tourists is now 21,000 homes in Cuba that rent out to tourists.>> Americans are still not officially allowed to visit as tourists because their trips must fit certain categories, like educational travel. Most descend on Havana rather than the coastal resorts, which is why developers are pouring money into spots like the Gran Hotel Manzana in the heart of the capital, where rooms will range from $360 for a low season double to $5,000 for the presidential suite.