FIRST AIRED: July 10, 2017

Nice work! Enjoy the show!


You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!



>> The final defeat of Islamic State in Mosul is a very important stage in the battle against the group, but it's not the end of the story.>>
> There are more battles to come, and there could be repercussions as the jihadis may try to hit back, as Reuters Bureau Chief in Turkey Dominic Evans explains.
>> Even with the loss of Mosul, which is a huge symbolic blow to Islamic State, and the battle for Raqqa, there are still areas that the jihadis control. In Iraq, Hawija east of Mosul, Tal Afar to the west and a large area on the border. So, Islamic State still poses a threat.
It still has territory it can retreat to. That means it still has the capability to train, to send fighters to Europe, and abroad to carry out attacks. That ability is weakened. It's not so easy for them to get into Syria. It's not so easy for them to get to Iraq but its not completely eradicated.
The other important thing to remember about Islamic State and its ideology is that its precursors in Iraq suffered defeat before. So, their power has ebbed and flowed in the past. It's possible that they could go into hiding for a while, and then recover their standing in the next two or three years if the Iraqi forces, if the forces in Syria as well, are not able to keep them under complete control.
One other important aspect of Islamic state is that the ideology would not necessarily be killed off by military defeat on the battleground. If the fighters in Syria and the fighters in Iraq lose the territory that they hold, they still have a powerful narrative, they still have a story of, in their perspective, standing up to the West, battling against huge odds.
That can still inspire people who might wish to carry out attacks in London, in Paris, elsewhere in Europe.