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00:00:02
>> It's the new desired way of getting around in Washington DC, gliding on a motorized scooter.>> It's fantastic, it's easy to sign up, we signed up in two seconds. We put our credit card number in and we've been riding, I think it's been about three hours, really.
00:00:16
We've been here for three or four days on bus tours. We've hit all those spots today, just in half the time.>> A rider can locate the nearest scooter with a smartphone app. Unlock it for a dollar, and then use it for 15 cents per minute, and the kicker?
00:00:37
You don't have to search for a docking station. You can leave the scooter right on the curb.>> This is our first ride, yeah, I think they're a lot of fun. And they're very easy to use and get around on.>> The sharing program prohibits riding on sidewalks.
00:00:50
>> Yeah, I could see where somebody could get in trouble. But if you pay attention to what you're doing and are respectful to other people and watch for cars, you should be fine.>> The scooter sharing program in Washington, which is in its pilot phase until August, has been successful in the nation's capital so far.
00:01:06
But cities like San Francisco and Austin have been less than thrilled about these motorized vehicles. City officials there are frustrated at riders dumping the scooters and blocking paths for the elderly and disabled.>> I'm getting kind of bored with the illegal parking conversation.>> Maggie Gendron works for Lime Bike one of the scooter operators like Bird and Spin.
00:01:29
And said it's unfair to take scooters away from people who actually follow the rules.>> Because a very small percentage of people abuse these products, that does not mean that we should limit it for everybody.>> And she says, it takes away from the main goal of the program, reducing air pollution.
00:01:47
The electric scooters have a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour. Washingtonians are required to use roadway bike lanes and properly curb discarded scooters. With a cap of only 400 scooter permits in the district, there may not be enough scooters to go around. If warmer temperatures lure commuters to trade a seat on the crowded Metro for a chance to glide around and enjoy the city.