FIRST AIRED: February 3, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:01
>> Queuing day and night for something as simple as water. Capetown is weeks away from its taps running dry.>> The struggle is real.>> A crisis that is stymieing a flow of visitors to this tourism hotspot and forcing residents to water collection points like this one.>> People have kinda started a frenzy.
00:00:21
All the water at the shops are sold out. Everyone's collecting at every single spring point possible and it's just going crazy at the moment.>> On Thursday officials further limited water usage to 50 liters per person per day, around two thirds of a bath-full. Those stricter restrictions after new data showed the South African city's dams are now less than a quarter full.
00:00:45
And April 21st, the day experts predict the water will run out completely is getting closer. To avoid the queue some residents are finding ways to reuse their drain water. Tour guide Allan Damon has built this water-saving system to pump drain water into a tank which is then used to flush the toilet.
00:01:03
>> I'm disappointed that we are today cuz I just feel this, Those that have to take care of us didn't actually do their jobs.
00:01:14
MUSIC]
00:01:15
>> But the crisis not just affecting locals. Hotels have been asked to tell guests not to use baths and to limit showers to two minutes. And that's reportedly prompting visitors to cancel their vacations here. Last year, around 10 million people visited Cape Town, where tourism is a key driver of the economy and employment.
00:01:34
The fear now is that, as water dwindles, so, too, will tourist dollars.