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COMING UP:Share Opener Variant 3

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00:00:01
>> Alexa, open the spheres.>> Okay Jeff.>> That's how the world'd richest man and founder of Amazon.com, Jeff Bezos, opened his own mini rainforest called the the Spheres. It's home to 400 species, 40000 different plants, and as of Tuesday, it will also have Amazon staff. The spheres are on campus at the tech giant's headquarters in Seattle, the pinnacle of a huge development in the South Lake Union district sprouting where warehouses and parking lots once stood.
00:00:34
Amazon is famous for its demanding work culture and the company hopes this space will let employees reflect and ideally hatch new plans and products. Reuters' tech correspondent Jeffrey Dastin had a first look.>> Three glass domes make up the sphere. They stretch several stories high and inside you see trees.
00:00:53
There are what's called living walls or walls just full of plants that employees can observe and appreciate, and there also are these make shift work spaces. They're actually behind me, something called the bird's nest and it's almost like a conference room except it's not enclosed, there are chairs in a circle so people can have a flowing conversation and work or eat lunch.
00:01:16
>> It's a decade in the making, Amazon has invested $3.7 billion on infrastructure since 2010, a figure that has public officials across North America eager to host its next big project, a second headquaters. The company says it expects to invest more than $5 billion on the project and create 50000 jobs.
00:01:37
To compete for a so called HQ2 kicks off last summer, and earlier this month Amazon narrowed 238 applications down to a top 20. The finalists from New York and Boston to Austin, Texas are largely cosmopolitan cities that draw in highly educated textilists. A winner will be chosen later this year.