FIRST AIRED: March 22, 2018

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00:00:00
>> In all honesty, they do not care if we do not get out and vote.>> Students from Stoneman Douglas High School and their supporters take their case for tougher gun laws to the streets of Washington this weekend. But activists are hoping they'll march into the voting booth this fall and beyond.
00:00:16
Democrats and other groups will be out in force at the March for Our Lives in a major voter registration push. Katanga Johnson is on the story.>> Many nonpartisan groups, like Rock the Vote and Head Count, are hoping that by having kids, or those who are young, first-time voters register to vote, that they'll be able to turn out to the midterm elections this year and really have their voices heard.
00:00:41
>> But now on Saturday and in the future, our voices are gonna matter.>> Many people I've spoken to feel that that passion for young people turning out to the polls may wane between now and November 6th. Oftentimes, young people can rally around an issue and get almost very excited about having their demands heard.
00:00:59
But when it's time to actually mark their ballots, they oftentimes don't register or don't follow through. So activists see this as an opportunity to not just help young people march, but also have them register to vote and have a tangible impact on legislation.>> So let me hear your excitement.
00:01:17
>>
APPLAUSE
>> Some say that even if young people don't turn out to the pools in larger numbers as result of higher registration this weekend, that they may motivate their parents or motivate their siblings. The general American audience might be inspired to really turn out in greater numbers during midterms because of the activism of these young survivors.
00:01:39
>> The activism of Parkland students has spurred a national movement, shaking up the calcified gun control debate in Washington, though so far failing to spark any major moves from lawmakers on Capitol Hill.