FIRST AIRED: March 19, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> Together, we will end the scourge of drug addiction in America.>> President Trump,on Monday, unveiled his plan to battle the opioid epidemic in America. At an event in New Hampshire, a state hit hard by the crisis, Trump outlined the proposals from the White House. Among them, capital punishment for some drug dealers.
00:00:19
>> If we don't get tough on the drug dealers, we're wasting our time. Just remember that. We're wasting our time. And that toughness includes the death penalty.>>
APPLAUSE
>> Echoing the just say no campaigns of the 80s and 90s, Trump proposed airing commercials on the dangers of the drug as a cheap and effective deterrent.
00:00:40
And when they see those commercials, hopefully they're not going to be going to drugs of any kind.>> Eventually the President used the event to bolster his anti-immigration stances, like on his proposed border war with Mexico.>> 90% of the heroin in America comes from our Southern border, where eventually the Democrats will agree with us and will build the wall, to keep the damn drugs out.
00:01:07
>> In addition to pursuing street dealers, Trump's plan directs the Justice Department to aggressively go after criminally negligent doctors and pharmacies, and to take criminal and civil action against opioid manufacturers that break the law. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 42,000 people died from opioid overdoses in 2016.
00:01:26
The White House did not offer examples on when it would be appropriate to sentence drug dealers to death. A spokesman referred further questions to the Justice department. Public health experts doubt whether tougher sentencing reduces the supply of street drugs. Trump's plan also seeks to cut opioid prescriptions by a third over the next three years, by targeting over prescriptions in federal programs and calls to expand access to treatment facilities for those addicted.