FIRST AIRED: February 15, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:00
>> We perform the experiments in this biological safety cabinet.>> This maybe the key to preventing the spread of the flu virus. Housed in a Columbia University lab, it's at the heart of a potential breakthrough study published this week in scientific reports, which found that a certain type of UVC light can kill the airborne virus.
00:00:22
SOUND] B
fore it lands on its next victim. Researcher David Welch guided us through the contraption.>> So what we're looking at here is three of our what we call Far Alter Violent See Lights. So in the experiment we created an aerosol which is tiny droplets of water and in those tiny droplets we put a virus, so we put influenza virus.
00:00:45
And through that windows where we would position our lights and then selectively expose the virus as it moves through the chamber.>> The virus then returned back to this bottle mostly dead, a victim of the UVC rays. By attaching the virus to those water droplets, Welch and his team replicated how the flu travels through a sneeze or a cough.
00:01:07
>>
COUGH]>>
Far UVC light, unlike UVA and UVB rays, which can cause skin cancer and eye damage, so far appears to cause no harm to the human body itself. The next step explains the study's lead scientist is the practical application of the lights. In such public places as doctor's offices, hospitals, school, and airports.
00:01:31
>> We're right in the middle of a seasonal flu epidemic But the other type of flu that we worry about a lot is pandemic episodes of influenza. So that's transmitted from country to country.>> And don't worry about turning the world purple. Far UVC light is not visible to the human eye.
00:01:51
The violet who you see here comes from making this lamps and is easily filtered out