FIRST AIRED: February 14, 2018

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00:00:00
>> I need to be finished on what I've done.>> Jacob Zuma may be on the way out, but he's hanging on by the skin of his teeth.>> We're spending more time discussing Zuma must go. I don't understand why.>> Reuters' Ed Cropley is in Johannesburg.>> Now we just had an extraordinary intervention by South African President, Jacob Zuma.
00:00:22
Who's been completely absent from the public eye for the last two weeks, when pressure's been mounting on him to resign. Zuma's just given an hour long interview on state television, the SABC. In which he's complained about his treatment at the hands of the ruling party. Saying it's unfair, it's unprincipled, and he's done nothing wrong, and really, there's no reason for him to resign.
00:00:43
>> But the ruling ANC, long divided, has at last thrown its weight behind the campaign to remove Zuma, who is plagued by charges of corruption.>> We are now proceeding with->> It says it will support a motion of no confidence in the president brought by an opposition party.
00:01:00
That vote is now set for Thursday if Zuma doesn't quit first. ANC chiefs say they aim to elect party leader Cyril Ramaposa as president of the country by Friday at the latest. They made their decision hours after the net dramatically tightened around Zuma and his inner circle.>> This morning, elite police raided the home of the Guptas in central Johannesburg.
00:01:23
These are the very controversial Indian-born family businessmen who'd been friends of the president for the last few years. And who've being accused of massive scale corruption, including even influencing top cabinet positions.>> Those and other corruption charges, as well as a stagnant economy, have cast a pall over Zuma's nine years in office.
00:01:43
He's overcome several no confidence votes before, but surviving the next one looks like a tall order.