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00:00:02
>> A chat app has sparked a late start for the MeToo movement in South Korea. The country's corporate culture is dominated by men, but recently a wave of complaints has emerged of sexual harassment in the workplace. That includes a public prosecutor who went public last month that she was groped by a senior official at a funeral and then demoted.
00:00:22
In response, an app called Blind added a new feature. A board that allowed anonymous reports of misbehaving bosses and colleagues. Reuters' Heekyong Yang explains why it's become an outlet for MeToo.>> South Korean employees do not have trust in facing their in-house whistleblower hotline system. Stating that their claims or their identities may not be handled confidentially.
00:00:45
The mistrust of the official channels of investigating case as one of the many reasons why many South Koreans took to the app, where people can anonymously chat and discuss these sensitive issues without fear of being identified.>> Koreans tend to be wary of speaking up in the big family run conglomerates that lead South Korean business.
00:01:04
They're afraid companies will turn on them for rocking the boat, and they'll be victimized again.>> After the blind app launched the MeToo board, in less than 24 hours after the launch of the board more than 500 posts were uploaded, during heavy traffic which made the app temporarily inaccessible.
00:01:23
>> Earlier this month, posts on Blind alleged the chairman of Asiana Airlines forced flight attendants to hug him and made repeated physical contact. He later issued an apology, and the company said it had taken no action against him. Although the app has raised awareness, many users say they've yet to see significant changes in their workplaces.
00:01:43
Last year, the World Economic Forum ranked South Korea 118 out of 144 countries on gender equality.