FIRST AIRED: February 22, 2018

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Transcript

00:00:01
>> This is what a catastrophic failure in global leadership looks like, according to Amnesty International's annual report. Amnesty said the exodus of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar, where they were subjects to what the UN's top human rights officials has called, ethic cleansing, is the ultimate consequence of a society encouraged to hate.
00:00:22
>> Peddling hatred and fear against whole groups of people based on who they are ultimately leads only in one direction. When leaders fostered or turn a blind eye, the end game is horrific and literally fatal.>> For the second year running, Amnesty singled out US President Donald Trump.
00:00:42
Describing his efforts to ban people from several predominantly Muslim countries from entering the US as hateful and accusing him of discrimination and xenophobia. Trump has argued that that ban was required to keep Americans safe. Trump joined Egypt's Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, the Philipines' Rodrigo Duterte, Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro, Russia's Vladimir Putin, and China's Xi Jinping on a list of leaders who, according to Amnesty, are callously undermining the rights of millions.
00:01:11
But it was not all grim reading. Amnesty said 2017 also showed how those threats to people's rights were met with protest from Poland to Zimbabwe, India to the US.>> In 2017, the USA figured prominently on both sides of the ledger. Significant and serious new threats to human rights met huge and energetic resistance.
00:01:34
>> Don't shoot.>> Hands up.>> Don't shoot.>> Hands up.>> In the wake of the Florida school shooting, Shetty added there was no better example of the new era of social activism than those students standing up against gun violence in the past few days.