FIRST AIRED: February 24, 2018

Nice work! Enjoy the show!


You’re busy. We get it.

Stay on top of the news with our Editor’s Picks newsletter.

US Edition
Intl. Edition
Unsubscribe at any time. One click, it’s gone.

Thanks for signing up!



>> Republicans in the NRA may be headed for a collision on gun laws. I'm Andy Sullivan in Washington, where President Trump and his Republicans are lining up behind the idea that teenagers shouldn't be allowed to purchase assault rifles. It's a sign that the GOP may be reconsidering its traditional hostility towards gun restrictions in the wake of last week's school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
But there's one big problem, gun rights groups like the National Rifle Association don't support that idea. That means Republicans are gonna have to decide whether they are willing to go up against one of the most powerful right-wing interest groups in the United States.>> We must take care of our kids.
>> Florida's Republican Governor Rick Scott on Friday said, that he would make sure that no one under 21 could buy a gun unless they served in the military or law enforcement. Trump and Florida Senator Marco Rubio also favor that idea. Current law allows people as young as 18 to buy the military style AR-15 rifles that have been used in a number of mass shootings.
Notably by the 19 year old who's accused of killing 17 people at a high school in Parkland, Florida last week. That's not going to fly with the NRA, which spent $55 million to help get Trump and other Republicans elected in 2016. The gun lobby would prefer to shift the focus away from gun restrictions and toward ramping up school security.
And the idea, strongly supported by the president, of arming school teachers. The coming weeks will show exactly what steps Republicans are willing to take to prevent future mass shootings. Most of the ideas they're supporting at this point like beefing up school security, and banning bump stocks actually line up with NRA.
But they're under pressure to show that they're taking action as they face a tough election in November. The question is, how far they'll be willing to go?